Expungements

Houston Expungement Attorneys

Expunging Criminal Records in Texas

A large percentage of people who are arrested, charged and convicted of crimes in Texas are not hardened criminals, but are ordinary people who have simply made serious mistakes or who were in the wrong place at the wrong time. Unfortunately, the consequences of a criminal conviction will often follow the individual for the rest of his or her life, even after the completion of what may or may not have been a fair and just sentence.

The fact of having a criminal record can make life difficult, to say the least. Landlords may use it as a reason to refuse your rental application; banks and other lenders may deny you credit; employers may turn down your job application, or you may be denied a promotion.

However, you may have the opportunity to free yourself from these damaging consequences. Provided that you can meet the strict requirements for eligibility, you may be able to make a fresh start by filing a petition for expungement.

Do I qualify for expungement?

Texas law, which refers to expungement as an expunction, provides for the opportunity to have certain information permanently removed from an individual's criminal record. Not all convictions or arrest record can be expunged, but those which can include but are not limited to:

  • An arrest which did not lead to the filing of charges
  • An arrest with charges which were dismissed
  • An arrest with charges which ended up in an acquittal
  • Certain juvenile misdemeanor crimes
  • Certain alcohol offenses involving minors

If your petition for expungement is granted, your criminal record will be cleared and you will no longer have to disclose the fact when requested to do so on an application for employment, housing or credit. Only certain types of offenses are eligible for expungement, but you can find out whether you are qualified by contacting Guerra & Farah, PLLC for a free consultation with a criminal defense attorney in Houston.

Orders for Nondisclosure

Even if you are not eligible for expunction of your record, you may still be able to reduce the consequences of having a criminal record by petitioning for an Order for Nondisclosure. An Order for Nondisclosure will not clear your record, but it will place restrictions on who can access the information. For example, your arrest or conviction will no longer be on the public record, but they will still be accessible by government agencies and may be used in the event that you are again charged with a crime.

Whether you are pursuing an expunction or Order for Nondisclosure, an attorney from our team can assist you with every aspect of the process, from determining your eligibility to preparing your petition and advocating on your behalf in court. We understand how much is at stake for your future, and we want to help you! Contact Guerra & Farah, PLLC now to get started on your petition or take a few moments to fill out a free case evaluation to learn more!

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